Posted by: badbirdz2 | April 13, 2007 @ 6:26 am

Migration Lite

A trace of migration out of Cuba and small movements over the state of Florida last night. Winds turned northerly and birds are actually seen fighting some of the wind over the northern radar stations (not pictured, but on the velocity image you can see movement from N–>S and S–>N, indicating that something is getting blown with the wind (dust, pollen, insects, etc.) while something else is fighting it (e.g. birds)). A few birds were seen leaving over the south Florida radar stations including Miami, Melbourne and Tampa.

Frames are every 1/2 hour for reflectivity and velocity, and 1 hour for the regional composite
Base Reflectivity image from Key WestBase Velocity image from Key West Base Reflectivity image from MiamiBase Velocity image from Miami Regional Base Reflectivity for the Southeast

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Responses

  1. Although migration was light, a few birds stopped at Cape Florida. Liz and I banded 22 new birds, of 11 species. It was a nice mix of West Indies and Yucatan flight origins. Interestingly, there were pulses of Worm-eatings and Black-and-whites mid and late-morning, respectively. Liz noticed gray and tan images over the ocean ~4 AM and we wonder if these represented our birds that came in during daylight hours. Any suggestions?

  2. Hey Robin! 🙂
    I think from Brennan’s reports two days ago, there were very high numbers of Worm-eating and Black-and-whites in the Keys, so it would seem consistent to be getting them up your way as they moved north. There wasn’t the “migration highway” last night as there had been the previous night, so birds were fighting headwind and may have only moved short distances from the Keys to South Florida. As for early morning arrivals, I did check the radar and it looked like there were some scattered birds out over water early in the morning which is consistent with Liz’s observations. Now if you were sitting on the beach instead of hunkered down in a hammock you might be able to confirm it. 😉

    Thanks so much for your reports from the field!


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