Posted by: NatureIsAwesome | September 4, 2010 @ 8:28 am

Birds Over My Hammy!

This is the radar from 5:00pm last night to 9:00am this morning.

Frames are every 1/2 hour. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.
Base Reflectivity image from Key West, FL Base Velocity image from Key West, FL Base Reflectivity image from Miami, FL Base Velocity image from Miami, FL Composite base reflectivity for the Southeastern USA

Birds were really on the move last night with a tailwind a clear sky and the urge to fly. As the sunset returns started to flood the screen. The entire panhandle region had lots of activity flying over. Birds were moving in a general N>>S direction throughout the night. An exception was birds flying out over the water from the Tampa area. Winds were out of the west for the majority of the state, Miami area had SW winds for most of the night. These west surface winds will bring in some diversity as well as some western species like Blackburnian, Hooded, Kentucky Warblers etc…

Jacksonville radar was on fire last night, a large cloud of returns came in during the early morning hours with Cedar Key in it’s path. The whole region had activity into the area but with optimal conditions these birds may have just flown overhead south.

St. Pete area looked real nice on radar and hopefully these birds that passed up the northern regions of the state landed for you guys. Returns continued to come in as the radar cut out this morning. Birds were still out over the water so a late morning even early afternoon rush may just arrive on the shores after a long flight over the Gulf.

Miami radar looked the best it has this season although it was not much. A look at the velocity image shows returns coming into as well as going away from the radar which tells us that birds flew past the Miami radar. Returns were still overhead early this morning as rain came in from the south, this may have concentrated some birds. Ladies of the Cape, a puff of birds was over the Key as the rain came in. Any goodies to report?

Key West radar picked up birds leaving the Keys for Cuba. Another bunch of returns entered the KW radar as storms came in and looked to have grounded these birds. The returns seem to have grounded from Big Pine south to Key West. Hopefully we have some birders out there to tell us what went down out there.

Hope to hear from you all today, there are lots of birds out there. Leave a comment in the comments section as this site works best when you read the intrep then share your sightings and weather observations. Have a great Labor Day Weekend!

Nature is Awesome,
Angel and Mariel

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Responses

  1. Great Variety at Matheson: Blackburnian, Swainson’s, Chestnut-sided, and at last – Cerulean!

    Day break at Matheson Hammock (west of Old Cutler) seemed disappointingly quiet, but as I’d hoped, migrants made their presence with excellent variety as it lightened up.

    Blackburnian Warbler second day in a row!!! This time it was 2 birds, 1 being a male being hit by early morning light. Spectacular!
    The hammock floor was well covered by Ovenbirds, and it was near miraculous that my bins happened upon a lonesome Swainson’s Warbler on the northwestern trail.
    In the hammock soon after, along with a feeding flock of Worm-eating Warblers and various Redstarts, a Cerulean female made its appearance, perfect in the cool light of the forest. It has been since 2006, I wasn’t sure if this would be the year!

    The usual suspects were there, Black-and-white, a couple of Black-throated Blue, 1 Yellow-throated Warbler, N. Parula, Red-eyed Vireo and more.

    An early Chestnut-sided Warbler (1yr f.) later caught my eye feeding actively over a tannic pond where a Northern Waterthrush foraged, on the mangrove trail (southeast).

    Various Cooper’s Hawks were around, possible migrants. Also Ospreys, gliding high due south, seemed on the move. Chimney Swifts were everywhere, and the swallows were nicely mixed, with enough Bank and Cave Swallows to make it interesting.

    On the way out I bumped into Paul Bithorn and crew, they’d split from the TAS group. I set them off after the Chestnut-sided. I hope they found it.

  2. Variety not too great in Kissimmee, Vireos actually outnumbered Warblers, Heres the list:

    White-eyed Vireo-2
    Yellow-throated Vireo-1
    Red-eyed Vireo-12
    Barn Swallow-1
    Blue-gray Gnatcatcher-15
    Northern Parula-8
    Black-and-white Warbler-1
    Yellow-throated Warbler-1
    Waterthrush sp.-heard

  3. Best morning so far at Cape Florida! 37 new birds were captured; highlights were 2 Blackburnians, one hooded, one Louisiana waterthrush, quite a few worm-eatings, redstarts, ovenbirds and black & whites. Seen but not captured was a Eastern wood-pewee.

    Birds were active in the trees at sunrise which suggests they came down overnight because of rain; also they were mostly very fat so probably wouldn’ve stopped except for the weather. The entire southern horizon was flashing with lightning before dawn; it is possible birds see this and land before they hit it. There also was evidence of a light shower overnight on Key Biscayne.

  4. PS…congrats on the Cerulean, Raf!

  5. Thanks for suggesting the coast – Boca beach area had Hooded, Worm-eating, N. Parula, Black & White, and Black-throated Blue warblers, plus Great Crested Flycatcher, etc. At last some migrants!

  6. rey, Bill and I had a nice variety this morning birding from the Ag fields to the Annex. Things looked promising for warblers as we picked up 8 species quickly between Lucky Hammock and the Annex, and then the warblers disappeared. We made up for it with six Buff-breasted sandpipers. Five were on the east side of 217th Avenue just north of 9336, and another was on the west side. Here are the highlights.

    Shorebirds:
    Buff-breasted Sandpiper (6)
    Pectoral Sandpiper
    Black-necked Stilt
    Black-bellied Plover
    Killdeer
    Solitary Sandpiper
    Spotted Sandpiper
    Greater Yellowlegs
    Lesser Yellowlegs
    Least Sandpiper
    Short-billed Dowitcher
    Dowitcher sp
    Peep sp
    Not-dowitcher sp

    Warblers:
    Prothonotary
    Northern Parula
    Black-throated Blue
    Prairie
    Black-and-white
    Redstart
    Ovenbird
    Northern Waterthrush

    Others:
    Alder Flycatcher
    Orchard Oriole
    Blue Grosbeak
    Eastern Kingbirds (about 1,000, maybe 2,000)
    FOTS Northern Harrier
    FOTS Kestrel

    Toe

  7. Thanks everyone, we really appreciate the sightings. The sightings helps us understand the relationship between the radar and what actually is seen on the ground.

    Here is what we saw today…

    Had a good time @ Barnes today! It was a bit hot but the birds did not seem to mind. Redstarts had to the bird we saw the most of, followed closely by Worm-eating Warblers. Highlights for the day wrre two female Blackburnian Warblers, a Hooded, Black-throated Blue female that kept us busy trying and a very active Empid. We are going to review photos of the Empid and see if it seconds our suspicion of it being a Least Flycatcher. Great-crested Flycatcher were everwhere as well.

    Here is a list of birds seen and heard…

    Blackburnian
    Hooded
    Redstart
    Parula
    Pine
    Worm-eating
    Black-throated Blue
    Prairie
    Oven
    B & W
    BG Gnatcatcher
    Red-eyed Vireo
    Empid sp. (calling it a Least)
    Great-crested Flycatcher
    Chimney Swift
    Purple Martin
    Barn
    NWR
    Bank Swallow

    Nature is Awesome
    Angel & Mariel

  8. Managed to bird both parks for about 45 minutes each before the rains this afternoon. Had the following for Indian Hammocks:

    White-winged Doves
    Mourning Dove
    Red-bellied Woodpeckers
    Barn Swallows (many)
    Gray Kingbird
    Eastern Kingbird (5)
    Great Crested Flycatcher
    Mockingbird
    Blue Jays
    Gnatcatchers
    Yellow-throated Vireo (FOS)
    Red-eyed Vireos
    Ovenbird
    Black-and-white Warblers
    Prairie Warbler
    Baltimore Oriole (female/FOS)
    Cardinals

    AD Barnes had:

    Mourning Dove
    Mitred Parakeets
    Red-bellied Woodpecker
    Barn Swallows
    Great Crested Flycatcher
    Gnatcatchers
    Red-eyed Vireos
    Black-and-white Warblers
    Yellow-throated Warbler
    Prairie Warblers
    Worm-eating Warblers
    Redstarts

    Stephen

  9. Managed to bird both parks for about 45 minutes each before the rains this afternoon. Had the following for Indian Hammocks:

    White-winged Doves
    Mourning Dove
    Red-bellied Woodpeckers
    Barn Swallows (many)
    Gray Kingbird
    Eastern Kingbird (5)
    Great Crested Flycatcher
    Mockingbird
    Blue Jays
    Gnatcatchers
    Yellow-throated Vireo (FOS)
    Red-eyed Vireos
    Ovenbird
    Black-and-white Warblers
    Prairie Warbler
    Baltimore Oriole (female/FOS)
    Cardinals

    AD Barnes had:

    Mourning Dove
    Mitred Parakeets
    Red-bellied Woodpecker
    Barn Swallows
    Great Crested Flycatcher
    Gnatcatchers
    Red-eyed Vireos
    Black-and-white Warblers
    Yellow-throated Warbler
    Prairie Warblers
    Worm-eating Warblers
    Redstarts

    Stephen

  10. After a disappointing trip to Palm Beach last weekend, I tried to find some shorebirds on Merritt Island. Black Point was rather unimpressive with very few shorebirds. I was surprised to see a decent number of Black Terns as well as a White-rumped Sandpiper near Stop 8. The Brevard side of Shilo Marsh Road was equally unimpressive with 1 yellowlegs. The Volusia side, once I got over that terrible feeling of leaving beloved Brevard County, had some of the best shorebirding I have seen in a while. Most of the birds were on the mud right on the other side of the ditch including 3 American Golden-Plovers, a Wilson’s Phalarope, another White-rumped Sandpiper, and a Dunlin. There were also lots of peeps and yellowlegs, as well as a few dowitchers and avocets. There was a good number of Reddish Egrets along the road as well. If anyone is looking to get good looks at a variety of shorebirds (I think I had 18 species) I would strongly recommend Shilo Marsh Road.

    Andy Bankert

  11. I spent the morning at Lake Lotus Park in Altamonte Springs (Seminole County). As I was driving into the park, I saw a Black Bear in the road, just south of the playground area.

    Shortly after I started birding, I spotted an adult male Kentucky Warbler on the north end of the swamp trail, about 200 feet south of the cypress stand on the west side of the park. About fifteen minutes later, I had an adult female Canada Warbler in the dense, scrubby wooded area several hundred feet north of the cypress stand. The Canada was with a Prairie Warbler and was headed east, deeper into the woods when I last saw it.

    There weren’t a lot of migrants in the park this morning but I did also have my first of the season Baltimore Oriole.

    Location: Lake Lotus Park
    Observation date: 9/3/10
    Number of species: 45

    Anhinga 3
    Great Blue Heron 1
    Great Egret 1
    Little Blue Heron 3
    Tricolored Heron 2
    Turkey Vulture 1
    Osprey 1
    Red-shouldered Hawk 3
    Red-tailed Hawk 1
    Common Moorhen 12
    Limpkin 1
    Rock Pigeon 6
    Mourning Dove 1
    Barred Owl 1
    Chimney Swift 3
    Belted Kingfisher 1
    Red-bellied Woodpecker 5
    Downy Woodpecker 7
    Pileated Woodpecker 2
    Great Crested Flycatcher 1
    Yellow-throated Vireo 1
    Red-eyed Vireo 3
    Blue Jay 1
    Fish Crow 2
    Barn Swallow 4
    Carolina Chickadee 3
    Tufted Titmouse 4
    Carolina Wren 8
    Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 15
    Northern Mockingbird 2
    Northern Parula 1
    Yellow-throated Warbler 2
    Prairie Warbler 2
    American Redstart 1
    Ovenbird 1
    Kentucky Warbler 1
    Common Yellowthroat 6
    Canada Warbler 1
    Eastern Towhee 1
    Northern Cardinal 5
    Red-winged Blackbird 1
    Common Grackle 2
    Boat-tailed Grackle 2
    Baltimore Oriole 1
    House Finch 1

    Paul Hueber


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