Posted by: NatureIsAwesome | October 1, 2010 @ 10:19 am

Huge Flight Into and Out of Florida

Wow the radar looked amazing last night. Loads of birds flew into the state and loads fly to their winter homes last night. This is the radar from 5:00pm last night to 9:00am this morning.

Frames are every 1/2 hour. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.
Base Reflectivity image from Key West, FL Base Velocity image from Key West, FL Base Reflectivity image from Miami, FL Base Velocity image from Miami, FL Composite base reflectivity for the Southeastern USA

Wish we had more time for the radar today because it looked awesome over the state. A change in the atmosphere seems to have triggered yet another impressive flight. Along the GA/FL border birds were busy making their entry into the state. Densities were on the large side, winds were somewhat cooperative for the birder but better for the birds. Jacksonville radar looked great over the night, birds were entering the radar from the coast and flying out over the Atlantic courtesy of a west wind during the peak of the night.

Farther down the east coast the Melbourne radar was also showing similar images. The winds were slightly less and shifting over to NW winds later in the morning over this area. Birds also could be seen coming in from the west into the radar just before sunrise.

Miami had tough winds to deal with all night, NNW winds averaging 14kts is just too much for birds not to at least try to make it in one flight. These birds entered our radar and zipped passed on the way to the Bahamas and Cuba.

Key West peeps, whoa you could be hit by a wave of birds sometime late morning. Birds that were displaced over the gulf are entering the radar as of 10:00 a.m. and may just drop down over the Keys chain from Big Pine to KW. Hope to hear from birders down that way today. Dry Tortugas, what can we say; wish we could be there today. It looks like they may get rocked by some rouge birds that have been flying all night over the Gulf.

Lots of birds out there, let us know if you see any of them. Please leave your sightings here.

Nature is Awesome,
Angel and Mariel

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Responses

  1. More out than in on the flight. I found 1 Yellow-throated Warbler, 1 Red-eyed Vireo, and a bunch of Blue-gray Time-wasters at the east side of Matheson this morning. Bill had only 2 Prairie and 1 Red-eyed Vireo at Barnes, while The Jetty, as in Year Of, had only Palm warblers at Lucky Hammock and a Western Kingbird at the Annex. No other migrants to speak of.

    Toe

  2. The huge flyover continues; there are birds still flying offshore at 3PM. They kept right on going….we only banded 21 birds at Cape Florida but did catch 4 Swainson’s warblers; probably a daily record. Flight calls at sunrise and a little after included Swainson’s thrush, bobolinks and a large mumber of palm warblers.

    Not the best day for birding down here, but on the bright side, millions of birds had safe passage last night and are that much closer to their winter homes!

    PS. we heard FOS gray catbird meowing so Toe is right….;)

  3. I was able to bird Saddle Creek County Park this morning. Not many migrants, but some good ones, including a couple new for the season.

    1 Empidonax sp.
    2 Red-eyed Vireo
    1 Swainson’s Thrush
    2 Gray Catbird
    3 Tennessee Warbler
    2 Northern Parula
    1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
    1 Cape May Warbler (nice surprise!)
    1 Yellow-throated Warbler
    1 Prairie Warbler
    1 Black-and-White Warbler
    3 American Redstart
    5 Ovenbird
    1 Northern Waterthrush

    Cole Fredricks
    Winter Haven, FL

    • Thanks Cole we missed you on the site. Hope to see you on here more often. Great report! A & M

  4. Hi All,

    Jim Wells and I birded the park today and our best bird was an immature Nashville Warbler, which is a rare, but regular migrant here at the park Other species of note of the total of the 71 species seen today included the following:

    Blue-winged Teal 43
    Sora 2
    Snowy Plover 1
    Ruby-thr. Hummer 1
    Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
    House Wren 1 (FOS)
    Swainson’s Thrush 3
    PalmWarbler 65 (High count for this early!!!)
    Scarlet Tanager 2 (FOS)
    Chipping Sparrow 1 OS)
    Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 (FOS)
    Baltimore Oriole 1

    Also of note, while to induce a Screeh Owl to call at the Dunedin Hammock, we heard no fewer than 30+ Swainsons and 2 Gray-cheeked Thushes migrating around 6:35-6-55 AM!!

    Great Birding and get out into the field as the birds are coming through!

    Dave Gagne

  5. Hi All,

    Jim Wells and I birded the park today and our best bird was an immature Nashville Warbler, which is a rare, but regular migrant here at the park Other species of note of the total of the 71 species seen today included the following:

    Blue-winged Teal 43
    Sora 2
    Snowy Plover 1
    Ruby-thr. Hummer 1
    Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
    House Wren 1 (FOS)
    Swainson’s Thrush 3
    PalmWarbler 65 (High count for this early!!!)
    Scarlet Tanager 2 (FOS)
    Chipping Sparrow 1 OS)
    Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 (FOS)
    Baltimore Oriole 1

    Also of note, while to induce a Screech Owl to call at the Dunedin Hammock, we heard no fewer than 30+ Swainsons and 2 Gray-cheeked Thushes migrating around 6:35-6-55 AM!!

    Great Birding and get out into the field as the birds are coming through!

    Dave Gagne

  6. Hi all,

    Lucy and I ended September with 25 warbler species, 20 of which were seen in our yard on the 27th on the heels of the strong front. We added Chat, Worm-eating, and Hooded in our yard before the month ended and Nashville at Ft. Morgan, AL. Big misses were Bay-breasted, Cerulean, Cape May and Blackpoll that usually occur only on strong E or NE winds, which we did not have.

    It has been clear and mild with very low humidity here in the extreme W. Panhandle with N winds continuing since the 27th and forecast through next week with strong N winds, perfect weather for birding. It has been our experience that when the first front of the season is very strong and N winds continue unabated for days, the numbers of Neotropical migrants passing through thereafter decrease substantially, as though most of North America empties out in one fell swoop. That’s not to say they won’t be trickling through throughout the month, but birding, at least for Neotropical migrant warblers, slacks off considerably. Other migrants will still be coming down along with winter visitors, like our first Phoebe and Swamp Sparrow today at Ft. Pickens. Three cheers for October the Great!!!

    Bob Duncan

  7. Yellow-billed Cuckoos were around both keys in good numbers yesterday (Thursday) and Blackpoll Warblers were in Cape Florida and Bear Cut. Some firsts (for us) are showing up: Eastern Phoebe, House Wren (Michelle had it this morning), Summer Tanager, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and Gray Catbird. I heard a Downy Woodpecker in Cape Florida and saw another one along Arthur Lamb, Jr. Road — a good species for these barrier islands. Falcons are around in good numbers, with a combination of 2 American Kestrels, 3 Peregrines and 9 Merlins for the 2 locations. In Cape Florida, a Connecticut Warbler showed up yesterday (unusual in fall) and 4 Swainson’s Warblers, today. Swainson’s Thrushes were overhead early both mornings and several were around the park today.

    Robin

  8. Yesterday after work we decided to give Greynolds Park a try as it is the closest park to campus. We were there for one hour and tallied the following.

    Northern Parula
    Cape May Warbler
    Black-throated Blue Warbler
    Prairie Warbler
    Palm Warbler
    Black-and-white Warbler
    American Redstart
    Worm-eating Warbler
    Ovenbird
    Common Yellowthroat
    BG Gnatcatcher

    Chuck-will’s-widow
    Summer Tanager
    Swainson’s Thrush
    Veery
    GC Flycatcher

    Red-eyed Vireo
    YT Vireo

    Nature is Awesome
    Angel & Mariel

  9. Today while eating lunch we saw a few birds to go with the grub; best being a female or imm. male CANADA WARBLER complete with a faint chestband…YEAH! Eat your heart out Toe!

    Ovenbird
    Common Yellowthroat
    BTB &
    Redstart were seen as well.

    Frisky kittens were stalking the birds outside the window 😦 The fountain outside the window must attract birds cause we were right on Biscayne Blvd.

    A & M

  10. It’s amazing how you guys find more great birds during your lunch breaks than all other birders combined spending hours in natural areas. You guys rock!

    • The best part is that we did not find it; IT FOUND US! We were just sitting there waiting for our lunch to come out and I said to Mariel, what is that yellow bird? It then flew down onto a low branch and started to gleam insects off of leaves feet from the window. Did not even need binocs! I don’t think they intentionally set up the courtyard the way they did but the Fig with the fountain underneath is working wonders. The Common Yellowthroat was just hanging out inches from the windows, amazing lunch! Never would have imagined this would have happened in a million years.

      A & M

  11. Key west has been very quiet last couple of days.bird of the day yesterday was Chestnut-sided Warler. Also seen were RT hummers,Tennessee, BTB, Indigo, Bobolink etc. Managed to end up with 10 warbler sp. between three parks and a sparrow too. Coolest is watching the hawks fly by-counted more than 50 while reading a book on the beach at Bahia Honda! 30 flew by in one long line.

    Tricia

  12. The Curry Hammock HawkWatch (FL Keys) finally experienced its first great flight of the season on Friday October 1, tallying 1001 migrating raptors.
    The weather and the winds cooperated at last.

    Raptor Tally for 10/01/10:
    Sharp-shinned Hawk – 229
    Cooper’s Hawk – 13
    Broad-winged Hawk – 462
    American Kestrel – 148
    Peregrine Falcon – 69
    Merlin – 4
    Mississippi Kite – 1
    Osprey – 17

    Finally no more eastern wind blasts and rain – the skies were clear and the wind mild out of the north. The birds continued steadily at an even pace throughout the day.

    Swallow migration was also excellent at the site, yet we had little time to focus on them. Although Barn Swallows were by far the most abundant species, diversity picked up in the afternoon, when Northern Rough-winged, Bank, and many Cliff Swallows were in flight. Dragonflies of several species were also in great numbers – Halloween Pennants seemed quite numerous in the morning, yet later the diversity was greater.

    Large flocks of Anhinga slowly kettling south passed us over – each with 30 to 60 birds! What a sight.

    A Scarlet Tanager was at Dagny Johnson (Key Largo) early in the morning. The migrants were not at their greatest numbers, but a few Magnolia Warblers, Black-and-whites, Am.Redstarts, Worm-eating and others made for a very nice 45 mins. Not a single Ovenbird could be found, when exactly a week earlier they covered the floor.

    • I forgot one species!!!
      We also counted 51 Northern Harriers!!!

  13. hola hola birdies! This morning we had a Fork-tailed Flycatcher appear on the north-westernmost corner of Puerto Rico, along with a Yellow-billed cuckoo and a trickle of warblers. I am hoping that tomorrow finally brings that wave of neotropical migrants home for the winter….

    • Hola Ana

      Awesome report from PR! We would love to see reports from PR whenever possible, such a cool connection with the other side of the migration. We see them off and you see them as they come in. Enjoy the migration Anna!

      A & M


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